Gyllene Tider’s first time on stage.

32 years ago.
Gyllene Tider – Live at Medborgarhuset (Bio Reflex) in Getinge

May 12, 1978, Friday at 7.30 pm
Tickets: 10 SEK [just 20 were sold, other people were allowed to enter for free]

The band:
Per Gessle
Mats Persson
Micke “Keef” Andersson (aka “Syd” in the later years)
Janne “Bas” Carlsson

Total time: 70 minutes

Per Gessle: This is we who are Gyllene Tider! (microphone wasn’t on)

1. Rebel, rebel (var blev du av?) [early version of “Åh Ziggy Stardust (var blev du av?)”]
2. Jag vet [Swedish version of Dr. Feelgood’s “I can tell”]
3. Pornografi [Per dedicated this one to Curt H-son, king of pornography]
4. London [7-minutes long ballad]
5. Min vän
6. Barbacka [heavy rock song]
7. Bobbos boogie [song about Magnus Uggla]
8. Det blåser upp till storm [11-minutes long; Per on his only solo on Gibson-guitar]

PG: We are going to end up this gig with one long track, probably too long, written by Tommy Steele.

9. Syndafloden [12-minutes long with 6-minutes long intrumental part inspired by Pink Floyd’s compositions]
10. Gloria [with both English and Swedish lyrics]

PG: Mats Persson on guitar, on drums our B52’s Micke “Keef” Andersson, on bas Janne Carlsson and my name is Rutger Backe.

RB was Halmstad’s BK’s goal shooter – Rutger Backe, though Per supported Halmian, the other Halmstad’s football team.

Source: Jan-Owe Wikström, Gyllene Tider, Stockholm 1997, pages: 26-30

Christoffer Lundquist: “Producing is about being open to whatever might happen”

Judith and Kirsten met Christoffer Lundquist in Frankfurt before the show on Sunday. In the following interview you’ll find information about Christoffer’s career, love to music, touring with Per and Roxette and much more.

Judith: How did you start to play music, compose, get in to music?

Christoffer: My parents got me and my sister when I was 6 years old to play violin. And I hated that. I hated every second of it, and I never practiced, never did anything, was horrible, but I sort of discovered it was nice to play notes and find them for yourself, and make up little tunes, so when I was maybe 10 or 11 I skipped the violin and finally dared to tell my parents I didn’t want to do that anymore, and I got an old guitar from my aunt, who also introduced me to the Beatles. From then on I’ve done nothing but playing, try to write arrangements, I am a totally single-minded person, that’s the only thing I do.

J: How many instruments do you play?

C: I actually only play guitar and bass, you know, reasonably well, the rest is sort of just cheating, but since I buy so many instruments, I have the possibility to practice with them. I play a bit of decent flute, half-decent saxophone, clarinet, I got an oboe, that was fun for a year and then it was too hard, so I skipped that. I have so many different instruments in my studio, but they are all kind of keyboard instruments.

J: Was Brainpool your first band?

C: No, I had my own band when I was in high school, we played prog-rock, loooong 20-minute songs which I wrote and forced everyone else to play.

J: So when did you start to compose your own stuff?

C: Probably at the age of 10, when I got the guitar. That’s the reason for playing for me, to try to make your own music or play your own stuff.

J: Did you actually study music?

C: No, never, the three years of violin when I was 6 to 10 is all my music education.

J: And how did you get to Brainpool?

C: David Birde was a friend of mine from high school, he had Brainpool going, the bass player was to go and do this army service, so I just joined as a replacement for him. But it turned out that the four of us got along very well and we liked each other, so when his army was over, he was no longer welcome I am afraid, it’s a bit harsh, but it’s the way it was. That was I think 91. It took a few years until we got a record deal and released our first album.

J: How was it that Per discovered your music in first place?

C: He had just started this side of Jimmy Fun Music which was going to release other music, besides Per’s own. We were one of the first bands to send him some demos, just by chance, that’s just the kind of music Per likes. Besides that, our singer, Janne, he sounds a little bit like Per, a little bit of this childish voice if you like, a bit high pitched, so he just fell for it. Back then Per used to listen to all the demos which had to do with Jimmy Fun, later he got a bit tired of it, and didn’t care so much, but in the beginning he was really into it.

J: So it was actually his decision to publish your music.

C: Yes, his and Ben Marlene, the guy he had hired to run Jimmy Fun Music. So yes, we were the first band he signed.

J: Tell about your first album, Soda, which songs were included?

C: You normally collect the best songs from many years and put them on the first album, so that’s the way it worked with us. The second album was a bit more difficult because we had to write the same amount of good quality songs in a shorter period of time.

J: How did you write the songs? Did you compose them all together?

C: Janne and David wrote most of the songs, I helped with a couple of them, and then I was mostly into the arrangement and producing.

J: The style throughout the albums changed quite a lot.

C: Yes, that was because we got easily bored. Once we had done something, we wanted to try something else, different.

J: Indeed.. you started with some kind of punk and..

C: …and ended up with rock operas! Haha! That’s a huge change, I agree.

J: I actually got the first CD when you went on tour, during C!B!B!, you might not remember, it’s 15 years ago, some fans were waiting outside of the hotel for Roxette to come out, and you came out, all of you four, we stared to talk with you, you looked quite surprised we even knew who you were. How did you experience the touring with Roxette?

C: Well, we came from nowhere and in a couple of months we were suddenly playing to 15000 people in Barcelona, so we were just “aaaahhh!”. It was an amazing adventure. We soon realized it was amazing and fun and learnt a lot. But at the same time nobody really wanted to hear us, of course, I mean, that’s the way it is with support acts. We also realized that after a while, some of the hard-core Roxette fans sort of started to like us, so that was nice. We got a better reaction in some countries. But I remember a gig in Prague, where they had particularly big tickets, and “Roxette” was written on them with large printing, after we had played a couple of songs, people started to raise their “Roxette tickets” .. but well, it didn’t matter, we just played even faster and louder.

J: But I still remember in Barcelona some people sang along. My sister and I had spread your CD … We had lots of fun.

C: Yes, I remember that. That was fun, to find small groups of people at the shows who actually listened and sing along. I remember the gig in Barcelona, we didn’t get much reaction from the audience in general, but Spain is different, you know, so I remember I was playing, I just took a couple of steps to the left and then everybody stood up, I was like “WHAT?”, that had never happened before. Haha!

J: I remember there was even a fanclub, started by a Swedish girl called Annika.

C: Yeah! There was also a girl called Nadja, yes, I think that was the name, from Germany.. or maybe Austria? It was really crazy in Sweden for a year or two, a lot of young girls, like 14-year old girls who fell in love with Janne. It was a bit like Gyllene Tider but on a smaller scale. Btw, the first concert I ever went to was a Gyllene Tider concert, during Moderna Tider, I remember I listened to it in secret because I thought it was a big embarrassing, a bit girly music, and I liked heavy important prog rock, but there was something about his voice you couldn’t resist, couldn’t not listen to it, that hit me.

J: What happened then with Brainpool?

C: It was mainly, the three of us who are still in the band, we drifted apart from Janne, so to say. It’s not that we weren’t friends, but we didn’t have that much in common, didn’t spend that much time together. The three of us are like brothers, so I guess that was the reason, he felt it wasn’t fun anymore. I don’t think he coped very well with the fame and success thing, he just didn’t like it so after a couple of years he felt like he didn’t want to do that anymore.

But we continue, it’s still fun, even though it’s more a hobby band now.

J: Do you still meet and play?

C: We try sometimes, let’s make a new album, but we need time and money and we are busy with many other things, to support ourselves. But we will again, one day, I’m sure. The Junk rock opera is very much alive. The American director who did the show in LA with it, two years ago, is coming to my place in January, we’ll write some new songs for it and develop it. They’ve done like 30-40 shows and now he knows what he feels is missing in the plot, so he’s going to tell us “we need to change this here,” or “this character is not clear enough”, so we are going to record some new music in January. I am really looking forward to it. After that we’ll start working on new Roxette music.

Read moreChristoffer Lundquist: “Producing is about being open to whatever might happen”

Back in the rox-future: part I (1986&1988)

Only 8 days are left to “Night of the Proms” tour start. It is a good occasion to rewind few of the most known Roxette live and playback performances from TV stations around the world. It is the very first part of our ultimate collection of rare YouTube links – collected just for RoxetteBlog.com visitors.

Enjoy.

1986:

Badrock Tour – Gyllene Tider: Sommartider Live & Roxette: Like Lovers Do Live

Surrender + Interview – GIG Part 1. Sweden 1986

Soul Deep + Secrets That She Keeps – GIG Part 2. Sweden 1986

1988:

Listen To Your Heart + Behind The Scenes + Credits

Listen To Your Heart 1988 First Video

Recording Look Sharp

Dangerous Playback TV

Dangerous Playback Jacobs Stege Part 1 – Sweden 1988

Jacobs Stege Listen To Your Heart + Interview.Part 2 – Sweden 1988

Jacobs Stege interview + The Look. Part 3 – Sweden 1988

Listen To Your Heart First Video

Thanks to Leo Zaragocin.

Q&A night on Twitter.

The yesterday’s night Per Gessle answered for many questions which he didn’t really do in the last few weeks. And for your information, there are a lot of interesting and mysterious answers:

Q from memami04: Will there be meet&greets like you did at the Party Crasher Tour?
A: Hope we can make a few. No promises, though.

Q from madonnajanetj:Can’t wait for NOTP in Antwerp. Will get a full, proper Rox Tour in 2010??:-)
A: Hmmm, I’d buy a ticket….

Q from frulampa: Is there a live CD or live DVD from “Room-Service”-Tour 2001???
A: Well, yes…. it’s lying around somewhere unreleased… something for another box maybe….

Q from rosa_73: What did you do in Italy? Did you buy new Ferrari?
A: Just had to check out that 458 Italia….
[Ferrari 458 Italia]

Q from memami04: Did you feel comfortable by doing Demos at Tits&ass again. Or do you like doing songs without Demos anymore?
A: Since I’m writing a bit for Marie there has to be some kind of demo around. I love doing simple ones at T&A.

Q from shneedelwoods: Writing songs & making demos? Solo stuff or brilliant new rox material? any plans yet?
A: I’m writing for Roxette, myself and GT. You never know what’s gonna happen, do you? Better be prepared….

Q from memami04:gessle over europe is coming! But when? Can’t wait to Watch the Show again. Do you Love the idea of a GT Tour again?
A: GT Tour? Hell, yes!

Q from RoxAnna1978: how do you feel abot the songs (demos) you have recorded now-do they sound good?
A: Do they sound good? Are you joking?

Q from elcondetin: What’s your mood nowadays in the demo writing/recording world.. uptempo slow -mid? How feels writing for Marie again? natural?
A: Nothing’s changed. I write anything. Anything to please me. Been writing some duets though (for a change).

Source: Twitter