Roxette to be featured in the Swedish Music Hall of Fame 2014

smhof-logo-180The Swedish Music Hall Of Fame has announced the first artists to be featured in the Hall of Fame and, of course, Roxette is among them!

The artists featured in the Hall of Fame have had a significant influence on the development of pop music in Sweden. The selection is done by an expert jury formed by various Swedish music journalists.  There is one condition in order to be elected: the record debut must have occurred the last 20 years before receiving the distinction. So for this year artists who had their debut in 1994 or earlier were considered.

The exhibition featuring Roxette will open on March 20th and will be available throughout 2014.

These are the first 12 elections to the Hall of Fame:

  • Evert Taube
  • Jan Johansson
  • The Latin Kings
  • Nationalteatern
  • Cornelis Vreeswijk
  • Stina Nordenstam
  • Ebba Gro?n
  • Eva Dahlgren
  • Entombed
  • Monica Zetterlund
  • Roxette
  • ABBA

This is the reason why the jury chose Roxette:

Pop music at its purest involves getting the listener to experience an enhanced sense of life for three or four minutes. Few groups in pop history have used that formula as skilfully and lovingly as Swedish duo Roxette, comprising Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle. Only four Swedish acts have ever topped the US charts. Roxete did it four times. Songs like “The Look,” “Listen To Your Heart,” “It Must Have Been Love” and “Joyride” have become evergreens that never disappear from radio play lists.

The Swedish Music Hall of Fame is located in the same building as ABBA The Museum in Djurgården, Stockholm. Tickets cost 195 SEK and gives you access to both museums.

Congratulations!

Gyllene Tider featuring other artists throughout the years

It is one of my hobbies to keep a sort of database of Swedish artists and their connections. It is a fact that there are many many artists in Sweden, and many of them have worked together at a certain point in their career. I think specially the time of the 70ies – 80ies was a period of many collaborations. I started with this many years ago and I am trying to bring my paper-excel database into a better platform. Who knows where this will end.

I also have to mention that the fact that I started to listen to the Swedish Per & Marie material opened the doors for me to other Swedish music and some of these artists have become a fix part of my music collection. And this collection is growing year after year.

Gyllene Tider is, of course, no exception, so I wanted to share part of these findings here.

Marie Fredriksson – Sang backing vocals on  “The Heartland Café” and duet with GT “Ingenting av vad du behöver” from “Puls”. She also sang “Vandrar i ett sommarregn” with GT on TV and joined GT on stage a couple of times before. On the other side, GT also joined Roxette in 2010 in Halmstad.

  

Eva Dahlgren – sang “Vandrar i ett sommarregn” in “Puls”. As far as I know, GT never played this song (or any other) live together. It’s about time!

Niklas Strömstedt – sang “Da’n före da’n” with Gyllene Tider, taken from Glitter, glögg & rock ‘n’ roll. Played as musician and sang backing vocals on “The Heartland Café” and other albums. On his TV program “Tack för musiken” he and Lasse Winnerbäck performed “Honung och guld”.

 

Christoffer Lundquist – Produced Gyllene Tider’s albums “Fin 5 Fel” and “Det är dags att tänka på refrängen”. Ex member of Brainpool. Brainpool and Gyllene Tider sang “My Sweet Lord (she’s so fine)” on TV together.

Wilmer X – joined GT on stage during Återtåget, sung “Marie i växeln” together. They also formed The Lonely Boys together with some of the GT-ers in 1995.

 

Anne-Lie Rydé – “When Love Is On The Phone” from “The Heartland Café”.

Lasse Lindbom – produced many GT songs and albums. He also recorded some songs written by Per, he performed “För dina bruna ögon skull” on Melodifestivalen in 1980. The song is also recorded by GT.

Clarence Öfwerman – like Christoffer, produced Gyllene Tider’s albums “Fin 5 Fel” and “Det är dags att tänka på refrängen”.

Christoffer Lundquist: “Producing is about being open to whatever might happen”

Judith and Kirsten met Christoffer Lundquist in Frankfurt before the show on Sunday. In the following interview you’ll find information about Christoffer’s career, love to music, touring with Per and Roxette and much more.

Judith: How did you start to play music, compose, get in to music?

Christoffer: My parents got me and my sister when I was 6 years old to play violin. And I hated that. I hated every second of it, and I never practiced, never did anything, was horrible, but I sort of discovered it was nice to play notes and find them for yourself, and make up little tunes, so when I was maybe 10 or 11 I skipped the violin and finally dared to tell my parents I didn’t want to do that anymore, and I got an old guitar from my aunt, who also introduced me to the Beatles. From then on I’ve done nothing but playing, try to write arrangements, I am a totally single-minded person, that’s the only thing I do.

J: How many instruments do you play?

C: I actually only play guitar and bass, you know, reasonably well, the rest is sort of just cheating, but since I buy so many instruments, I have the possibility to practice with them. I play a bit of decent flute, half-decent saxophone, clarinet, I got an oboe, that was fun for a year and then it was too hard, so I skipped that. I have so many different instruments in my studio, but they are all kind of keyboard instruments.

J: Was Brainpool your first band?

C: No, I had my own band when I was in high school, we played prog-rock, loooong 20-minute songs which I wrote and forced everyone else to play.

J: So when did you start to compose your own stuff?

C: Probably at the age of 10, when I got the guitar. That’s the reason for playing for me, to try to make your own music or play your own stuff.

J: Did you actually study music?

C: No, never, the three years of violin when I was 6 to 10 is all my music education.

J: And how did you get to Brainpool?

C: David Birde was a friend of mine from high school, he had Brainpool going, the bass player was to go and do this army service, so I just joined as a replacement for him. But it turned out that the four of us got along very well and we liked each other, so when his army was over, he was no longer welcome I am afraid, it’s a bit harsh, but it’s the way it was. That was I think 91. It took a few years until we got a record deal and released our first album.

J: How was it that Per discovered your music in first place?

C: He had just started this side of Jimmy Fun Music which was going to release other music, besides Per’s own. We were one of the first bands to send him some demos, just by chance, that’s just the kind of music Per likes. Besides that, our singer, Janne, he sounds a little bit like Per, a little bit of this childish voice if you like, a bit high pitched, so he just fell for it. Back then Per used to listen to all the demos which had to do with Jimmy Fun, later he got a bit tired of it, and didn’t care so much, but in the beginning he was really into it.

J: So it was actually his decision to publish your music.

C: Yes, his and Ben Marlene, the guy he had hired to run Jimmy Fun Music. So yes, we were the first band he signed.

J: Tell about your first album, Soda, which songs were included?

C: You normally collect the best songs from many years and put them on the first album, so that’s the way it worked with us. The second album was a bit more difficult because we had to write the same amount of good quality songs in a shorter period of time.

J: How did you write the songs? Did you compose them all together?

C: Janne and David wrote most of the songs, I helped with a couple of them, and then I was mostly into the arrangement and producing.

J: The style throughout the albums changed quite a lot.

C: Yes, that was because we got easily bored. Once we had done something, we wanted to try something else, different.

J: Indeed.. you started with some kind of punk and..

C: …and ended up with rock operas! Haha! That’s a huge change, I agree.

J: I actually got the first CD when you went on tour, during C!B!B!, you might not remember, it’s 15 years ago, some fans were waiting outside of the hotel for Roxette to come out, and you came out, all of you four, we stared to talk with you, you looked quite surprised we even knew who you were. How did you experience the touring with Roxette?

C: Well, we came from nowhere and in a couple of months we were suddenly playing to 15000 people in Barcelona, so we were just “aaaahhh!”. It was an amazing adventure. We soon realized it was amazing and fun and learnt a lot. But at the same time nobody really wanted to hear us, of course, I mean, that’s the way it is with support acts. We also realized that after a while, some of the hard-core Roxette fans sort of started to like us, so that was nice. We got a better reaction in some countries. But I remember a gig in Prague, where they had particularly big tickets, and “Roxette” was written on them with large printing, after we had played a couple of songs, people started to raise their “Roxette tickets” .. but well, it didn’t matter, we just played even faster and louder.

J: But I still remember in Barcelona some people sang along. My sister and I had spread your CD … We had lots of fun.

C: Yes, I remember that. That was fun, to find small groups of people at the shows who actually listened and sing along. I remember the gig in Barcelona, we didn’t get much reaction from the audience in general, but Spain is different, you know, so I remember I was playing, I just took a couple of steps to the left and then everybody stood up, I was like “WHAT?”, that had never happened before. Haha!

J: I remember there was even a fanclub, started by a Swedish girl called Annika.

C: Yeah! There was also a girl called Nadja, yes, I think that was the name, from Germany.. or maybe Austria? It was really crazy in Sweden for a year or two, a lot of young girls, like 14-year old girls who fell in love with Janne. It was a bit like Gyllene Tider but on a smaller scale. Btw, the first concert I ever went to was a Gyllene Tider concert, during Moderna Tider, I remember I listened to it in secret because I thought it was a big embarrassing, a bit girly music, and I liked heavy important prog rock, but there was something about his voice you couldn’t resist, couldn’t not listen to it, that hit me.

J: What happened then with Brainpool?

C: It was mainly, the three of us who are still in the band, we drifted apart from Janne, so to say. It’s not that we weren’t friends, but we didn’t have that much in common, didn’t spend that much time together. The three of us are like brothers, so I guess that was the reason, he felt it wasn’t fun anymore. I don’t think he coped very well with the fame and success thing, he just didn’t like it so after a couple of years he felt like he didn’t want to do that anymore.

But we continue, it’s still fun, even though it’s more a hobby band now.

J: Do you still meet and play?

C: We try sometimes, let’s make a new album, but we need time and money and we are busy with many other things, to support ourselves. But we will again, one day, I’m sure. The Junk rock opera is very much alive. The American director who did the show in LA with it, two years ago, is coming to my place in January, we’ll write some new songs for it and develop it. They’ve done like 30-40 shows and now he knows what he feels is missing in the plot, so he’s going to tell us “we need to change this here,” or “this character is not clear enough”, so we are going to record some new music in January. I am really looking forward to it. After that we’ll start working on new Roxette music.

Read moreChristoffer Lundquist: “Producing is about being open to whatever might happen”